Monday, July 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Lauryn Hill gets released from prison and releases new song 'Consumerism'

After spending three months in prison for tax evasion, R&B singer Lauryn Hill was released from a minimal security Federal Correction Institution in Danbury, Connecticut Friday morning.

Lauryn Hill gets released from prison and releases new song ‘Consumerism’

Hill pleaded guilty last year to not paying federal taxes on $1.8 million earned from 2005 to 2007. At that time, her attorney said she would pay more than $500,000 by the time of her sentencing. It was revealed Monday in court that Hill has paid $50,000. The South Orange resident got her start with The Fugees and began her solo career in 1998 with the acclaimed album "The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill." (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Hill pleaded guilty last year to not paying federal taxes on $1.8 million earned from 2005 to 2007. At that time, her attorney said she would pay more than $500,000 by the time of her sentencing. It was revealed Monday in court that Hill has paid $50,000. The South Orange resident got her start with The Fugees and began her solo career in 1998 with the acclaimed album "The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill." (AP Photo/Mel Evans) ASSOCIATED PRESS

After spending three months in prison for tax evasion, R&B singer Lauryn Hill was released from a minimal security Federal Correction Institution in Danbury, Connecticut Friday morning.

Hill was initially sentenced for failing to pay over a million dollars in income over a two year span beginning in 2005.

In a timely fashion, Miss Hill has released a new song called “Consumerism”, which is ironically now available on iTunes. In the song Hill raps at light speed while calling out a list of societal issues. It has got a punk rock tinge to it.

Here is a statement she released coinciding with the song:

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“Consumerism” is part of some material I was trying to finish before I had to come in. We did our best to eek out a mix via verbal and emailed direction, thanks to the crew of surrogate ears on the other side. Letters From Exile is material written from a certain space, in a certain place. I felt the need to discuss the underlying socio-political, cultural paradigm as I saw it. I haven’t been able to watch the news too much recently, so I’m not hip on everything going on. But inspiration of this sort is a kind of news in and of itself, and often times contains an urgency that precedes what happens. I couldn’t imagine it not being relevant. Messages like these I imagine find their audience, or their audience finds them, like water seeking it’s level.

Gabrielle Bonghi Philly.com
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Gabrielle Bonghi Philly.com
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