Wednesday, February 10, 2016

'Blind Side' director signs on to untitled Lenny Dykstra biopic

Now that director John Lee Hancock has honed his sports movie chops with The Rookie and The Blind Side, it looks like he's ready to bring to life the story of baseball's last troubadour: Lenny Dykstra.

‘Blind Side’ director signs on to untitled Lenny Dykstra biopic

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29 Apr 1993: Outfielder Lenny Dykstra of the Philadelphia Phillies stands on the field during a game against the San Diego Padres at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, California.
29 Apr 1993: Outfielder Lenny Dykstra of the Philadelphia Phillies stands on the field during a game against the San Diego Padres at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, California.

Now that director John Lee Hancock has honed his sports movie chops with The Rookie and The Blind Side, it looks like he’s ready to bring to life the story of baseball’s last troubadour: Lenny Dykstra.

Hancock recently signed on to the as-yet-untitled project to direct alongside Blind Side producer Gill Netter to tell Dykstra’s story. As Philadelphia knows, that story is an interesting one—after all, from his legendary presence on the ’93 Phils to the bankruptcy follies of his post-retirement life, we collectively just can’t get enough of ‘ol nails. Unless it’s about his time with the Mets. 

Dykstra suggested when the project was announced last year that Mark Wahlberg or Matt Damon play him in the film, which is both hilarious and a spot-on, oddly self-aware choice for Dude. Especially, as Collider’s Dave Trumbore notes, because Nails' ’86 Mets beat the Boston Red Sox in the ’86 World Series. And, you know, Mark Wahlberg hasn’t been in town since The Lovely Bones

Whoever takes the role, it’s likely that a large portion of the film will focus on Dykstra’s bankruptcy fraud proceedings. Via Collider: 

Plot details remain under wraps, so it remains to be seen whether the film will focus on his glory days on the baseball field from college to the majors, or his more criminal activities off the field after he retired in 1996.  Pleading guilty to bankruptcy fraud, concealment of assets and money laundering, Dykstra was sentenced to six months in prison, 500 hours of community service, and was ordered to pay $200,000 in restitution. 

No word yet on when this one’s set to start filming, but expect casting decisions to start rolling out soon. If you’re a betting man, Crossing Broad’s Kyle Scott has it at 2:5 on Wahlberg—I’d take it. 

[Variety]

Staff Writer
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