Sunday, April 20, 2014
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Patch Adams clinic nothing to sneeze at

Patch Adams, for those who may have forgotten, is a real-life person who survived his canonization via Robin Williams and Hollywood and is still out and about, changing lives and inspiring people in and beyond the world of medicine. He will be speaking at Drexel University College of Medicine, Geary Auditorium B; 245 N. 15th; 6:30 pm on July 23 and at Mercy Neighborhood Ministries, 20th & Venango, 6:30 pm on July 24. Admission is free.

Patch Adams clinic nothing to sneeze at

Patch Adams.
Patch Adams.

You may recall Paul Glover as the man behind Green Jobs Philly and the Philadelphia Orchard Project, or as the fellow who wants us to develop our own currency. But he's also a friend and fan of Dr. Patch Adams, who is coming to town this week, as philly.com's The Public's Health notes.

Yes, Patch Adams, for those who may have forgotten, is a real-life person who survived his canonization via Robin Williams and Hollywood and is still out and about, changing lives and inspiring people in and beyond the world of medicine. He will be speaking at Drexel University College of Medicine, Geary Auditorium B; 245 N. 15th; 6:30 pm on July 23  and at Mercy Neighborhood Ministries,  20th & Venango, 6:30 pm on July 24.  Admission is free.

The big news that speaks to Adams' inspiring energy and to Philly's own initiative is the Patch Adams Free Clinic now in development.

"We'll build an energy-efficient passive solar earth-sheltered structure," says Tom Greene, a member of the organizing team.  "Deep earth cover reduces heating and cooling bills toward zero.  "That's so that all our income goes to healing rather than utility bills," he adds. According to the preliminary floor plan, the clinic's waiting room will be a wildly decorated Relaxing Room, with soothing live music,, "couches and cots and clowns."   The plan shows spaces for exams, dental, optical, massage (the "Rub Room"), meeting and movie rooms, and a name-your-own-price health food cafeteria.  

Emphasizing their broader view of healing, there will be space for music, art, dance and theatre, plus training for green jobs.

Urban agriculture and "permaculture" are an essential part of the plan because "Fresh food is essential to good health.  And growing food in the neighborhood teaches basic  skills," says Caroline Immendorfer, RN.  She adds, "In the long run, we will be creating a model for healthy eating, healthy living, and healthy communities."

Dr. Patch Adams says, "I'm thrilled to be part of the stimulus for Philadelphia's grassroots initiative, for health care in loving service to all. It's so important for We the People to see that we can deliver beautiful health care much cheaper."

You can find out much more about the clinic and Dr. Adams' visit over at Paul Glover's blog, here.

Gesundheit!

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