Sunday, April 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

What the priests left behind: A little summer reading

You can't take it with you. An inventory of the cache of books left for the recyclers on Princeton Avenue, where the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is putting its $6.2 million summer vacation home for retired priests on the block.

What the priests left behind: A little summer reading

You can't take it with you, I guess is the moral. There's been a lot of moving out of places people thought were forever going on in the last weeks, the Inquirer from the Inquirer building at Broad and Callowhill, the Archdiocese from the Archdiocese shore home for retired priests on Princeton Avenue in Ventnbor. In both cases, a lot had to be left behind. At the Inquirer building, I found some old pica rulers and a guide to reporters rights written for the Atlantic City Press, and a lot of New Jersey legislative guides, marked not to be removed - ever, it seems - from the copy desk. And there they shall remain.

Over on Princeton Avenue, where the mansion assessed at $6.2 million
has been emptied of its vacationing priests and will soon be listed for sale, assuming those old stories of restrictions on the sale were just stories (the deed reflects no restrictions), some books just had
to be left behind for the recycling bin. I still feel like the story of that house has yet to be totally unraveled, like why does the plaque on the door say that Anne Hogan donated the property when it was her sister, Hannah G. Hogan who sold the place to Cardinal Krol in 1963 for $100,000? The Hogan sisters are wrapped up in a lot of mystery from here to Palm Beach, and certainly amassed a lot of real estate, much of which they transferred or sold to the Catholic Church, which in turn made a good amount of money off them. There's also the part of the priest they knew as a child in Philadelphia who they kept in very good digs down in Florida and who apparently stashed away a lot of their money. Stay tuned for how much the Church gets for the Princeton Avenue property. In any case, walking my dog the other morning, recyling day, I saw the boxes left on the street and took a brief inventory, which is below the photo of the porch, where presumably some of that summer reading was done. 

Box one: Up on top was a big maroon "The Code of Canon Law: A Text and Commentary." Other books included: The Sexual Celibate by Donald Goergan; The Priest, an intimate portrait of the Life and Work of a Parish Priest" By Don Gold" St. Paul, Apostle and Marty by Igino Giordani, The Catholic Priest as Moral Teacher and Guide (A Syposium); The 2003 Catholic Directory of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia; Sicilian Odyssey by Francine Prose; Decider by Dick Francis, "a Roma si racconta che' by Margherita Naval, Villanova University Catalog, "Journeys Home," by Marcus Grodi, which tells of Protestant Clergy and Laity "coming home" to the Catholic Church.

In the other box marked for recycling: "Woman of Faith", "Announcing the Good News, Homilies on the A cycle of Readings, "Come Rack! Come Rope! " By Robert hugh Benson, "Lord of the World," also by Benson. "Secrets of Angels and Demons by Dan Burstein and Arne de Keijzer; Pope Benedict XVI's book on Mary, Il Servo Della Carita, by Beato Luigi Guanella, the life of Basil Anthony Mary Moreau by Catta Heston, "Il beato Giovanni: Joshua and teh City by Joseph F. Girzone, "Faithful in Christ, the ministry and life of the Catholic Priest" the Ambler Warning by Robert Ludlum (hey, they were on vacation), "The
Fathers of the Church, Parish, Priest and People, New Leadership for the Local Church, "La Redenzione, by Rodolfo bandas, The Fathers of the Church, St.Cyril of Jerusalem, Where we are "American Catholics in the 1980s."

About this blog

Inquirer staff writer Amy S. Rosenberg has covered Philly police, city neighborhoods, Ed Rendell as mayor, the Jersey shore, Atlantic City, Miss America and the psychology of Eagles fans. She moved to Ventnor on July 3, 1995, which makes her a local, but not really.

Inquirer Staff Writer Jacqueline L. Urgo has spent every summer of her life at the Jersey Shore, and has lived there year-round for nearly 30 years, even fulfilling one of her bucket list dreams by once living in a house by the sea.

Since 1990, she has covered the waterfront for The Inquirer — from the Atlantic to the Delaware Bay shore — and some of the mainland in between. Along the way, she amassed an encyclopedic knowledge of this tear-it-down-and-build-it-back-up region, delving into the history and the hype of a place with a lot of unexpected stories to tell.

Reach The Downashore at arosenbegr@phillynews.com.

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