Thursday, September 18, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Tuna head has a story

Visitors to Brigantine's 4x4 North Beach recently encountered a tuna's head looking very much like a shoobie buried up to his neck in the same.

Tuna head has a story

How a tuna head ended up on the beach in Brigantine left some folks wondering. Photo: Annelise Gambardello
How a tuna head ended up on the beach in Brigantine left some folks wondering. Photo: Annelise Gambardello

Visitors to Brigantine's 4x4 North Beach recently encountered a tuna's head looking very much like a shoobie buried up to his neck in the same.

Where did it come from and where was the rest of it? folks wondered. This was no small tuna and certainly not something an angler would catch in the surf.

Someone knew and in the latest edition of the Brigantine Times,  Andy Grossman, the newspaper's fishing correspondent and owner of Riptide Bait and Tackle, reported that the 225-pound bluefin tuna washed up in the surf, dead but injury free and looking rather fresh.

It took a half-dozen guys to load it into a truck and they took it to Grossman's shop, where it was weighed.

There was some talk of eating the tuna and they took it back to the beach to cut it up, Grossman said. But after some additional consideration, it was decided that eating it was not such a good idea. Instead, the meat was taken to the  Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine, where Grossman and crew were told it would be used to feed some turtles in the center's care.

The head was left behind and while one would think gulls would have feasted on it, they kept their distance.

- Joseph A. Gambardello

About this blog

Inquirer staff writer Amy S. Rosenberg has covered Philly police, city neighborhoods, Ed Rendell as mayor, the Jersey shore, Atlantic City, Miss America and the psychology of Eagles fans. She moved to Ventnor on July 3, 1995, which makes her a local, but not really.

Inquirer Staff Writer Jacqueline L. Urgo has spent every summer of her life at the Jersey Shore, and has lived there year-round for nearly 30 years, even fulfilling one of her bucket list dreams by once living in a house by the sea.

Since 1990, she has covered the waterfront for The Inquirer — from the Atlantic to the Delaware Bay shore — and some of the mainland in between. Along the way, she amassed an encyclopedic knowledge of this tear-it-down-and-build-it-back-up region, delving into the history and the hype of a place with a lot of unexpected stories to tell.

Reach The Downashore at arosenberg@phillynews.com.

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