Friday, December 26, 2014

Rhea Hughes Rides A Bike - Rhea responds to clear the record

How not to ride a bike down the shore.

Rhea Hughes Rides A Bike - Rhea responds to clear the record

 

  UPDATE: Rhea has e-mailed her irritation with this post and notes that it was a passing bicyclist all Lance Armstrong-ed up, riding with traffic toward Rhea, riding against traffic, with whom she engaged in her back and forth, not a motorist. She's right. I remembered it wrong. Doesn't change the basic point. The post and her e-mail are below. I do take issue with her claim that she is "always available." I've e-mailed Rhea on past stories and never heard back. But thanks for responding on this one.

 

   With apologies to my colleague Steven Rea's (no H) global sensation Rides a Bike Tumblr, today's lesson for shoobies will focus on WIP sensation Rhea Hughes. Now we love Rhea, above, as much as the next person, but we have to take issue with Rhea's little rant on Monday. She described her irritation at being chastised by a motorist _ UPDATE, Rhea corrects me that she said it was another cyclist coming in the opposite direction, not a motorist _  while riding her bike against traffic with her young son in a bike seat on some unnamed back road at the shore. Um, Rhea. Can we talk? You are, how shall we put it, totally wrong. Rhea tried to defend herself by explaining that, riding on the left side of the road, she could better  see oncoming traffic and presumably protect herself and her son from an accident. Better to see the car that might take you out than be surprised by one from behind, was Rhea's faulty (and illegal) reasoning. And it was not a busy road, she said.

   But she also defended her bike ride with a common fallacy about the shore, that things are "more causal" down here. I see this in action all the time, in which people on vacation think common and common sense safety precautions don't apply because they are down the shore. It's a lovely and romantic notion, but dangerous. Parents who wouldn't let their kids set foot into the street in Cherry Hill have them merrily peddling their tricycles down the middle of the beach blocks on their way to the Boardwalk. Never mind the street is filled with driveways and parking cars and the like. It's the shore! Come on, just cross behind daddy! Let's just ride wherever we want. I've seen parents and kids sitting in the middle of the street toweling the sand off. Really? And now that cars are obligated to stop for crossing pedestrians, there's a whole new let's just walk wherever and whenever we want attitude with the resulting rear-end fender benders behind them. LIsten, I'm stopping for you, but the guy in the lane next to me, I can't guarantee.

   I wish these shore towns really were idyllic places where people can ride bikes anyway they want without worry, and some of the time, they do feel that way. But don't be fooled. On Monday, near the dog beach at the base of the Ocean City Longport Bridge, a bicyclist sat just off the roadway fixing a flat, rather than move over a foot more so that he wasn't at risk of being swiped by a car. Hey, it's the shore. Anyway, Rhea, you're a first time mom, and first time moms can be forgiven for being sure they know what's what with respect to their children, so I guess I understand the idea that if you can see the car coming, you can avoid the accident. (An orange safety flag on the back might help too). But really, as Al Morganti tried to tell you, the safer and legal place for a bicyclist to be is with traffic. Even at the shore. 

 

RHEA's E-Mail: 

Amy,
 
I guess you're a first time reporter - so maybe you can be excused for actually not getting the details of my story.  To quote your story:
 
 She described her irritation at being chastised by a motorist while riding her bike against traffic with her young son in a bike seat on some unnamed back road at the shore.
 
Um, Amy, can we talk?  It did not involve a motorist.  My story involved another biker who fancied himself Lance Armstrong junior.  You can feel free all you want to disagree with my stance.   I offer my opinion every day on the air.  But next time you decide to take a really strong stance on something - you might want to actually get the story right.  Or, you know, reach out to me.  I'm not that difficult to find. 
 
So, here's a little lesson that you apparently need to learn - try to get the story right before you get all high and mighty about all the things I did wrong.  I wouldn't have a problem with your story, nor your differing opinion, at all - except you started with something that never happened.  Even first time moms who aren't that bright know how stupid that makes one look.  Next time, just ask me.  We may disagree.  But I'm always available.
 
Rhea Hughes
Sportsradio 610 WIP
About this blog

Inquirer staff writer Amy S. Rosenberg has covered Philly police, city neighborhoods, Ed Rendell as mayor, the Jersey shore, Atlantic City, Miss America and the psychology of Eagles fans. She moved to Ventnor on July 3, 1995, which makes her a local, but not really.

Inquirer Staff Writer Jacqueline L. Urgo has spent every summer of her life at the Jersey Shore, and has lived there year-round for nearly 30 years, even fulfilling one of her bucket list dreams by once living in a house by the sea.

Since 1990, she has covered the waterfront for The Inquirer — from the Atlantic to the Delaware Bay shore — and some of the mainland in between. Along the way, she amassed an encyclopedic knowledge of this tear-it-down-and-build-it-back-up region, delving into the history and the hype of a place with a lot of unexpected stories to tell.

Amy S. Rosenberg
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