Thursday, April 17, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

If you thought this spring seemed really hot ... then you were correct!

Climatological spring ended on June 1, and this year marked one of the hottest on record in the northeast, according to Jessica Rennells, a climatologist and extension support specialist at the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University.

If you thought this spring seemed really hot … then you were correct!

Climatological spring ended on June 1, and this year marked one of the hottest on record in the northeast, according to Jessica Rennells, a climatologist and extension support specialist at the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University.

Some 35 stations within the region – from Caribou, Maine, down to Dulles, Virginia, and as far west as Huntington, West Virginia – report weather temperatures to the Cornell center for analysis. Scientists study the findings to determine possible patterns and climate changes.

“All of the first order stations in the Northeast ranked in their top three warmest springs; 28 of the 35 had their warmest spring on record,” Rennells said, referring to stations that monitor a wide variety of weather variables around the clock.

Rennells said the warmer than usual trend has continued for more than a year at 15 of the stations, where above normal temperatures have continued for at least 13 consecutive months.

No word on what all this bodes for the coming summer months at the Jersey Shore – traditionally a very hot time.

About this blog

Inquirer staff writer Amy S. Rosenberg has covered Philly police, city neighborhoods, Ed Rendell as mayor, the Jersey shore, Atlantic City, Miss America and the psychology of Eagles fans. She moved to Ventnor on July 3, 1995, which makes her a local, but not really.

Inquirer Staff Writer Jacqueline L. Urgo has spent every summer of her life at the Jersey Shore, and has lived there year-round for nearly 30 years, even fulfilling one of her bucket list dreams by once living in a house by the sea.

Since 1990, she has covered the waterfront for The Inquirer — from the Atlantic to the Delaware Bay shore — and some of the mainland in between. Along the way, she amassed an encyclopedic knowledge of this tear-it-down-and-build-it-back-up region, delving into the history and the hype of a place with a lot of unexpected stories to tell.

Reach The Downashore at arosenbegr@phillynews.com.

The Downashore Blog
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected