Saturday, December 27, 2014

Charlie Sheen's new sitcom wins big

Good news for fans of Charlie Sheen: He'll be on TV for years to come.

Charlie Sheen's new sitcom wins big

Good news for fans of Charlie Sheen: He'll be on TV for years to come.

FX announced Wednesday that it was ordering 90 more episodes of "Anger Management," the sitcom that represented the "Two and a Half Men" star's return to television.

The show, created by Bruce Helford ("The Drew Carey Show") and produced by Lionsgate, came to the basic cable network through an unusual deal in which, if the first 10 episodes met certain ratings goals, the 90-episode order would follow.

"Anger Management," in which Sheen played a therapist still working to overcome his own anger problems, was, said, FX, "the highest-rated new comedy series on cable in 2012," with an average 4.5 million viewers, 2.5 million of whom fell in the advertiser-targeted 18-49 demo.

The first two highly rated episodes are part of that average, but weren't, according to FX, counted in calculating the ratings goals, no doubt because the network knew that curiousity about Sheen's new gig would drive early ratings. (The network's never said exactly what level ratings had to reach to kick in the order.)

Because of the show's accelerated shooting schedule, Sheen -- who'll continue to  be joined from time to time by his father, Martin Sheen ("The West Wing"), as his character's father -- can expect to be pretty busy for at least the next couple of years, though 90 episodes of a standard network sitcom would more likely take at least four seasons to complete.

That's probably good news, too, for anyone who'd rather see Sheen remain clean and sober (or at least out of jail) as most of the star's past troubles seem to have occurred when he wasn't at work.

Everbody's a critic -- you could be, too

Ellen Gray Daily News TV Critic
About this blog
As the TV critic for the Philadelphia Daily News, I've always believed my job is less about thumbs -- up or down -- and more about the conversation. Because the more choices we have, the fewer people in our lives know what we're talking about when we say, "Did you see that?" And that's when television really starts to get interesting.

Ellen Gray Daily News TV Critic
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