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Inquirer Daily News

Archive: June, 2010

POSTED: Thursday, June 10, 2010, 11:47 AM

City Council today unanimously approved legislation to close a pension loophole that allowed outgoing Managing Director Camille Barnett to buy into the system after just two years service.

Barnett, who is set to leave the city government June 30, will receive a lifetime pension of $49,880 after paying $120,451 into the system. The perk was available due to rules that allow employees to count service in other municipalities.

Under the new legislation, proposed by Councilman Frank DiCicco, employees must serve for five years before they could buy into the pension program. The Nutter administration supported the legislation.
 

POSTED: Thursday, June 10, 2010, 11:23 AM

After months of haggling with the city over who should pay for parades and special events without reaching a resolution, City Council just voted to override Mayor Nutter's veto of legislation that would require the city to pick up police costs for parades and special events.

The vote was 14-3, with Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr., Curtis Jones Jr. and Jack Kelly opposing the override.

The bill's sponsor, Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez, who has been trying to work out a compromise with the Nutter administration, called for the override vote. Nutter last week vetoed the legislation, saying the city couldn't afford to shoulder those costs.

POSTED: Thursday, June 10, 2010, 8:59 AM

Sheriff John Green plans to step down before the end of term.

The city GOP re-elects leaders at a rowdy meeting attended by dissenters.

Former Managing Director Phil Goldsmith says Mayor Nutter is blowing off the city charter by downgrading the managing director job.

POSTED: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 5:20 PM

Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez tells us that after failing to reach a compromise with the Nutter administration on how to pay for ethnic parades, she will tomorrow seek to override Mayor Nutter's veto of legislation that would force the city to pay all police costs for special events.

"It is unfortunate that after 9 months, I could not work out an agreement with the administration. Therefore I will ask my colleagues to support an override of his veto," Quinones-Sanchez said via email.

Nutter last week vetoed legislation sponsored by Quinones-Sanchez that would require the city to pay policing costs for parades and other special events. Nutter announced in 2008 that the city would start charging for police and sanitation costs related to special events, due to financial constraints. It was a controversial announcement, particularly to the city's ethnic parades like the St. Patrick's Day and Puerto Rican Day parades.

POSTED: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 10:47 AM

Here's the release:

Butkovitz Releases City Council Audit
Controller finds Council paid for professional services without required contracts

PHILADELPHIA – City Controller Alan Butkovitz today released the FY2009-08 City Council audit that found Council purchased professional services without using a city-required contract.

POSTED: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 10:24 AM

John Baer takes on Gov. Rendell, writing about the cronyism and contradictions in "Ed World."

Former Eagles lineman Jon Runyan wins GOP primary for a U.S. Rep. seat in NJ.

Six workers for the city and the Philadelphia Parking Authority lose jobs over ticket fixing.

POSTED: Tuesday, June 8, 2010, 5:38 PM

Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez is still trying to reach a resolution with the city about how much parades and festivals should have to pay for services like police and sanitation. After a meeting with the Nutter administration yesterday, Quinones-Sanchez today sent Deputy Mayor for Public Safety Everett Gillison a proposal for a new policy that would limit costs for neighborhood and ethic events..

Mayor Nutter last week vetoed legislation sponsored by Quinones-Sanchez that would require the city to pay policing costs for parades and other special events. Nutter announced in 2008 that the city would start charging for police and sanitation costs related to special events, due to financial constraints. It was a controversial announcement, particularly to the city's ethnic parades like the St. Patrick's Day and Puerto Rican Day parades and the two sides have battled over determining the true costs.

In her proposal today, Quinones-Sanchez says that, based on police data, the 72 neighborhood and ethnic events in the city last year cost the city less than $200,000. That does not include the Mummer's Parade.

POSTED: Tuesday, June 8, 2010, 4:23 PM

With all the speculation about a Democratic primary election challenger next year for Mayor Nutter -- Gov. Rendell? City Councilman Bill Green? Former GOP mayoral candidate Sam Katz? -- we're here to report that Nutter had one easy election night yesterday.  He was re-elected as leader of the 52nd Ward.  Nutter told us it was a swift meeting, "very smooth, very quiet," and he faced no challengers for his post.

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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