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Inquirer Daily News

Archive: December, 2012

POSTED: Friday, December 21, 2012, 10:50 AM

District Attorney Seth Williams sends City Controller candidate Brett Mandel a text message to "watch his back" around union leader John Dougherty, who naturally finds out about it because Williams inadvertently sent the message to several people.  And U.S. Rep. Bob Brady makes a casino pitch to the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.

Gov. Corbett says his policies are meant to help the state's economy. Will Bunch asks: Is he really just increasing the rate of unemployment in Pennsylvania?

Speaking of Corbett, a revised financial disclosure form shows that a businessman connected to the Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling business spent $1,422 last year to fly the governor and his wife to Rhode Island and put them up in a hotel for a vacation.

POSTED: Thursday, December 20, 2012, 6:14 PM

Since returning to the Nutter administration a month ago Desiree Peterkin-Bell, director of communications will also be the City Representative, Mayor Nutter announced today.

Peterkin-Bell worked briefly with President Obama’s re-election campaign before rejoining the administration in November. Melanie Johnson had served as the City Representative and now will take on a new assignment as Director of Research and Marketing for major events.

Peterkin-Bell will be tasked with representing the city and the Mayor. Johnson’s new job includes attracting big events like the Made in America festival that took place over the summer.

POSTED: Thursday, December 20, 2012, 4:41 PM
FOP President John McNesby. (File Photo)

The city’s police officers may get a little extra cash just in time for the holiday season.

An independent arbitration panel reopened a five-year police contract awarded in 2009 and issued an award Thursday that includes two years of wage increases.

“This puts a little money in their pockets,” said John McNesby, president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, who estimated this could mean roughly $1,800 a year for the average cop.

POSTED: Thursday, December 20, 2012, 12:54 PM

Mayor Nutter and a host of city officials cut the ribbon on the new $110 million Juvenile Justice Services Center in West Philly on Thursday, capping off an effort to close and replace the troubled Youth Study Center that took more than a decade.

The polished new building, with its "healing garden," quad, smart boards and other amenities, is "just like a college campus," said Marq Temple, executive director of the center, while giving a tour to the media. 

"Our kids deserve the best," an emotional Temple said. "You can't get them on the right track by putting them in some run-down place."

POSTED: Thursday, December 20, 2012, 12:37 PM

Ah, the holidays, when family comes home to visit, kids dream of new toys and municipal unions taunt the mayor in song for a contract battle with no end in sight.

About 20 members of District Council 33 and District Council 47, which represent white-collar and blue-collar city workers, sung the "12 Days of Nutter" outside City Hall around noon today. 

POSTED: Thursday, December 20, 2012, 8:31 AM

A shore town celebrates the holidays in the wake of Sandy.

There's news on the AVI front. Turns out those temporary property tax hikes might not be so temporary anymore.

The city paid $777,500 to settle lawsuits dealing with a rogue narcotics unit.

POSTED: Wednesday, December 19, 2012, 4:55 PM

We're not sure how the lyrics of "The 12 Days of Nutter" go but we're pretty sure the mayor won't enjoy them when AFSCME District Council 47 members sing the song outside of City Hall Thursday at noon.  The union, which represents white-collar city workers, will also circulate a season's greeting of sorts -- a card that makes the mayor look like The Grinch of Dr. Seuss fame.

Nutter has been engaged in a long-running contract battle with DC47 and District Council 33, which represents the city's blue-collar workers.  The unions, which have been working without a new contract since July 2009, held a candlelight vigil and protest outside of Nutter's home in the Wynnefield neighborhood last month.

Nutter's administration wants the unions to accept changes to work rules and benefits.  The unions have said they will make no concessions in new contracts.

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
 Follow Jenny on Twitter.

Sean Collins Walsh is from Bucks County and went to Northwestern University. He joined the Daily News copy desk in 2012 and now covers the Nutter administration. Before that, he interned at papers including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News and The Seattle Times. E-mail tips to walshSE@phillynews.com
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