Monday, September 1, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Trash Fee vs. Property Tax Hike -- What's The Impact?

Debate continues in City Hall over what would be a better budget move – a $300 flat trash fee for every Philadelphia household, or a 12 percent property tax hike?

Trash Fee vs. Property Tax Hike -- What's The Impact?

Debate continues in City Hall over what would be a better budget move – a $300 flat trash fee for every Philadelphia household, or a 12 percent property tax hike?

The Nutter administration has proposed the trash fee as part of their plan to fill at $150 million projected budget gap. Councilman Frank DiCicco has proposed the property tax hike instead, saying it would provide more protections for seniors and low-income families and could be a tax write-off.

Here are some numbers on how the two proposals would affect the average Philly family:

According to data the administration provided to Council, the average tax bill in Philadelphia is $1,146. So a 12 percent property tax hike would mean an average increase of $137.52. That’s a lot less than $300.

Councilman W. Wilson Goode, who requested the information from the administration, said a property tax bill would be more fair.

“I believe the trash fee should be dead, because of how regressive it is,” Goode said. “There’s no way I can support a flat $300 fee.”

The administration has said they’re willing work with Council to figure this out. Council members huddled this morning with experts from the local economic consulting firm Econsult, as they try to determine the best way to balance the city budget.

Some have questioned the property tax proposal given the city’s well documented problems at the Board of Revision of Taxes. The Philadelphia Inquirer has published a series that describes a history of mismanagement, inaccurate assessments and political patronage at the agency.
 

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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Sean Collins Walsh is from Bucks County and went to Northwestern University. He joined the Daily News copy desk in 2012 and now covers the Nutter administration. Before that, he interned at papers including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News and The Seattle Times. E-mail tips to walshSE@phillynews.com
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