Friday, August 1, 2014
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Tom Wolf calls closed City Council meeting concerns "nonsense"

Tom Wolf, the Democratic nominee for governor, today described as "nonsense" concerns about his closed-door City Hall meeting yesterday with a quorum of Philadelphia City Council members.

Tom Wolf calls closed City Council meeting concerns "nonsense"

City Council Majority Leader Curtis Jones Jr. tweeted this photo of a closed-door meeting Thursday with Tom Wolf, the Democratic nominee for governor.
City Council Majority Leader Curtis Jones Jr. tweeted this photo of a closed-door meeting Thursday with Tom Wolf, the Democratic nominee for governor.

Tom Wolf, the Democratic nominee for governor, today described as "nonsense" concerns about his closed-door City Hall meeting yesterday with a quorum of Philadelphia City Council members.

Speaking after receiving the endorsement of the Service Employees International Union across the street from City Hall, Wolf said he did not understand suggestions that the meeting amounted to politicking with government time and resources.

"I mean, it's nonsense actually," Wolf said. "I mean, I went in to introduce myself, to say hi and to show that I'm running for statewide office and this is the biggest city in Pennsylvania and I'm happy to meet the people who make decisions on behalf of this city."

The state Republican Party continued to criticize Wolf today for the meeting, accusing him of trying "to spin his way out of admitting to politicking in Philly City Hall."

Gov. Corbett's campaign yesterday claimed the "questionable legality" of the meeting showed poor judgment by Wolf.  Corbett's campaign added to their news release a photo of the private meeting tweeted by Council Majority Leader Curtis Jones Jr.

Wolf spoke today in front of a backdrop of cheering union members, promising to take three actions if he wins the Nov. 4 general election.

First he vowed to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour and then index it to the rate of inflation.

Wolf also said he would expand Medicaid, which he said would give 500,000 Pennsylvanians health insurance and create 35,000 health industry jobs.

Finally, Wolf said he boost public education funding in Philadelphia and across the state.

"I know you can't throw money at every problem," Wolf said. "But you can't take money away from something that's as central to our society as education and hope to get to a good place."

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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Sean Collins Walsh is from Bucks County and went to Northwestern University. He joined the Daily News copy desk in 2012 and now covers the Nutter administration. Before that, he interned at papers including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News and The Seattle Times. E-mail tips to walshSE@phillynews.com
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