Monday, April 21, 2014
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Nutter on Supreme Court gun ruling

Mayor Nutter today tried to spin the Supreme Court ruling striking down the Washington DC gun ban as good news for Philadelphia's attempts at local gun legislation. Nutter quoted from the ruling several times. He said that while the Supreme Court upheld the right to have a weapon in the home, it made clear that the government could make restrictions on gun ownership. "What the Supreme Court decision speaks to is a right to keep a weapon in their home," Nutter said. "What we are dealing with is not lawful ownership, but illegal activity." Nutter later said "it is clear the court is sending a message. Governments have a right and responsibility to legislate in these areas and create reasonable restrictions." Earlier this year, Nutter signed five local gun control bills into law, prompting a lawsuit from the National Rifle Association, who argue that only the state has the right to dictate gun restrictions. A Common Pleas judge ruled several weeks ago that the city can enforce three of the laws. The laws upheld make it a crime to not report a lost or stolen gun within 48 hours; allow police to confiscate guns with a judge's approval from people considered a danger to themselves or others; and prohibit gun possession by people subject to protection-from-abuse orders. A one-gun-a month provision and a ban on assault weapons were blocked. The legal fight over the laws is expected to go to the state Supreme Court. Nutter said that the city has not yet started enforcing the laws, but is working on guidelines to do so. He wouldn't say if he has a start date for enforcement.

Nutter on Supreme Court gun ruling

Gun ownership advocates celebrated the Supreme Court´s ruling today that struck down D.C.´s handgun ban. (Jose Luis Magana/AP)
Gun ownership advocates celebrated the Supreme Court's ruling today that struck down D.C.'s handgun ban. (Jose Luis Magana/AP)

Mayor Nutter today tried to spin the Supreme Court ruling striking down the Washington DC gun ban as good news for Philadelphia's attempts at local gun legislation.

Nutter quoted from the ruling several times. He said that while the Supreme Court upheld the right to have a weapon in the home, it made clear that the government could make restrictions on gun ownership.

"What the Supreme Court decision speaks to is a right to keep a weapon in their home," Nutter said. "What we are dealing with is not lawful ownership, but illegal activity."

Nutter later said "it is clear the court is sending a message. Governments have a right and responsibility to legislate in these areas and create reasonable restrictions."

Earlier this year, Nutter signed five local gun control bills into law, prompting a lawsuit from the National Rifle Association, who argue that only the state has the right to dictate gun restrictions. A Common Pleas judge ruled several weeks ago that the city can enforce three of the laws.

The laws upheld make it a crime to not report a lost or stolen gun within 48 hours; allow police to confiscate guns with a judge's approval from people considered a danger to themselves or others; and prohibit gun possession by people subject to protection-from-abuse orders.

A one-gun-a month provision and a ban on assault weapons were blocked. The legal fight over the laws is expected to go to the state Supreme Court.

Nutter said that the city has not yet started enforcing the laws, but is working on guidelines to do so. He wouldn't say if he has a start date for enforcement.

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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Sean Collins Walsh is from Bucks County and went to Northwestern University. He joined the Daily News copy desk in 2012 and now covers the Nutter administration. Before that, he interned at papers including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News and The Seattle Times. E-mail tips to walshSE@phillynews.com
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