Friday, August 1, 2014
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Nutter proposes divestment from gun makers, sellers that don't follow his 20 "Sandy Hook Principles"

Mayor Nutter on Tuesday announced a plan to force gun manufacturers and retailers to adhere to a list of 20 "Sandy Hook Principles" or face divestment from Philadelphia and, he hopes, other cities and organizations across the country.

Nutter proposes divestment from gun makers, sellers that don't follow his 20 "Sandy Hook Principles"

This isn´t the first time Mayor Nutter has cursed in public.  ( David Maialetti / Staff Photographer )
This isn't the first time Mayor Nutter has cursed in public. ( David Maialetti / Staff Photographer )

Paging Rush Limbaugh.

Mayor Nutter on Tuesday announced a plan to force gun manufacturers and retailers to adhere to a list of 20 “Sandy Hook Principles” or face divestment from Philadelphia and, he hopes, other cities and organizations across the country.

“Americans have economic power in how we choose to spend and invest our money. We can and should use that power to send a very strong message that irresponsible corporate behavior will not be tolerated,” Nutter said at a press conference.

The requirements, based on the Sullivan Principles that sparked a divestment movement against South Africa’s Apartheid regime, include “develop and implement technology-enhanced safety measures for guns” and “support and promote a requirement that all background check data be shared by all federal agencies.”

Nutter, who is president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, said he hopes that cities like Los Angeles and Chicago will follow suit and that a broad movement of divestment against what he views as irresponsible weapons companies will take place.

Asked whether he fears a conservative backlash (similar to what happened when liberal groups protested Chik-fil-A and ended up sparking a mass show of support for the fast-food company by their opponents), Nutter said now is not the time to worry about what others will do but to take action with the tools that cities have. 

To start the process, Nutter is asking the city Pension Board to review its portfolio, find companies that might be in violation of the principles and notify them that they have to make changes.

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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Sean Collins Walsh is from Bucks County and went to Northwestern University. He joined the Daily News copy desk in 2012 and now covers the Nutter administration. Before that, he interned at papers including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News and The Seattle Times. E-mail tips to walshSE@phillynews.com
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