Monday, July 6, 2015

Nutter: new program will provide job-skills training to young adults

Mayor Nutter announced today that a new program called Philly Future Track will provide job-skills training to 130 young adults in Philadelphia. Check out the news release below for more information including how to apply.

Nutter: new program will provide job-skills training to young adults

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Mayor Nutter announced today that a new program called Philly Future Track will provide job-skills training to 130 young adults in Philadelphia. Check out the news release below for more information including how to apply.

Philadelphia, January 14, 2013– Mayor Michael A. Nutter and the Philadelphia Streets Department announced the launch of a new program called “Philly Future Track,” which will provide job-skills training and real-world work experience to 130 young adults in Philadelphia. Using service as a strategy to build civic and environmental stewardship, Philly Future Track will provide individuals with a paid position involving community service and other life and career building skills during a six-month period.

“Philadelphia, like many big cities, faces the challenges of unemployment and city cleanliness, which both have significant impact on the City as a whole,” said Mayor Nutter. “Philly Future Track is a smart strategy to address these challenges by investing in the development and job readiness of Philadelphia’s young adult population. Participants will gain valuable skills to prepare them for future employment while they engage in public service beautifying Philadelphia’s neighborhoods.”

This program will provide a temporary employment opportunity to participants who will assist with cleaning and beautification projects in key areas throughout Philadelphia. The program is designed to be a career readiness pipeline, providing the participants with enough resources and education to transition into full time employment, attend a 2 or 4 year higher education institution, enter into a vocational training program/school or be prepared to take the military aptitude test.

The participants were not previously enrolled in higher education and were unemployed. For three days a week over the course of six months, participants will work in teams on neighborhood beautification projects with direction from the Streets Department. The remaining two days are spent in the classroom, where participants will learn job readiness skills.

“Philly Future Track is designed to create stronger citizens who live, work and serve in their communities,” said Streets Commissioner Clarena I.W. Tolson. “By instilling self-sustainability and civic pride in Philadelphia’s young adults, they will be better prepared to take the next steps towards developing long-term careers, and in turn, improve the City as a whole.”

Philly Future Track is made possible by the partnerships of several city and community organizations. The City of Philadelphia, Department of Streets, Mayor’s Office of Community Services (MOCS), Philadelphia Organized to Witness Empower & Rebuild (POWER), Community Women’s Education Project (CWEP) and Community Marketing Concepts are all investing in the futures of both Philadelphia’s young adult population and the City of Philadelphia as a whole.

The Philly Future Track program is still seeking participants. If interested, please visit http://www.philadelphiastreets.com/future-track.aspx for more information and to learn how to apply.

For more information on the Department of Streets, please visit http://www.philadelphiastreets.com/.   For more information on MOCS, please visit http://www.phila.gov/mocs/.  For more information on POWER, please visit http://www.powerphiladelphia.org/.  For more information on CWEP, please visit www.cwep.org/. For more information on Community Marketing Concepts, please visit www.communitymarketingconcepts.com.

Jan Ransom 

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William Bender, a Drexel graduate who landed at the Daily News in 2007, has covered everything from South Philly mobsters to doomsday hucksters. He occasionally writes about local food trucks and always eats everything on his plate, whether it be a bloody rib eye or a corrupt politician. E-mail tips to benderw@phillynews.com
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David Gambacorta, has been a reporter with the Daily News since 2005, covering crime, police corruption and all of the other bizarre things that happen in Philadelphia. Now he’s covering the 2015 mayor’s race, because he enjoys a good circus just as much as the next guy. He’s always looking to get a cup of coffee. Send news tips and other musings on life to gambacd@phillynews.com
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