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Election 2010: Specter & Rendell Slam Sestak's On Ad

U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter and Gov. Rendell took some shots at U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak this morning, in advance of next Tuesday's primary election. They were both clearly peeved by a Sestak campaign ad that features video of Specter saying he switched from Republican to Democrat in order to be re-elected. The ad says Specter's switch was made "to save one job...his."

Election 2010: Specter & Rendell Slam Sestak's On Ad

U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter and Gov. Rendell took some shots at U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak this morning, in advance of next Tuesday's primary election.  They were both clearly peeved by a Sestak campaign ad that features video of Specter saying he switched from Republican to Democrat in order to be re-elected.  The ad says Specter's switch was made "to save one job...his."

Specter insisted that his vote for the stimulus package proposed by President Obama had helped save and create jobs in Pennsylvania, while putting at risk his political career.  Specter is seeking a sixth, six-year term in the Senate.  Rendell said he was offended by the Sestak ad.  "He wasn't thinking about saving his job," Rendell said of Specter. "He was risking his job."  Rendell said state statistics show there are 20,558 people currently working on jobs created by the stimulus package.  "So don't tell me Arlen Specter doesn't create jobs by taking a risky vote," Rendell said.

Specter said he could have glided to a sixth term if he had voted against the stimulus package and remained in the GOP.  "If I had stayed with the obstructionist Republican caucus, I would have had no problem," Specter said. "This claim of opportunism is outlandish in the context that I had a clear path to re-election if I had not voted for the stimulus package."

Rendell and Specter spoke as the Black Clergy of Philadelphia and Vicinity endorsed Specter in the offices of a Center City law firm.  Specter said it vital for city voters, especially the African-American community, to turn out on Tuesday.  Mayor Nutter agreed.  "This is a serious and important election," Nutter said. "We've got an open seat for governor. We've got the hottest race for Senate in the country."

A visit by Obama would probably help drive that turn-out.  But the White House has no plans to come to Philadelphia for Specter, who said he did not find that disappointing.  Specter noted that he is running a "dynamic commercial" with Obama praising him and Vice President Joe Biden appears in his radio ads. "He's done everything I asked," Specter said of Obama. "We've gotten terrific support from the White House."

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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Sean Collins Walsh is from Bucks County and went to Northwestern University. He joined the Daily News copy desk in 2012 and now covers the Nutter administration. Before that, he interned at papers including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News and The Seattle Times. E-mail tips to walshSE@phillynews.com
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