Friday, December 26, 2014

Councilman Goode Working on Alternate Paid Sick Leave Plan

Despite Mayor Nutter’s decision to veto the controversial paid sick leave bill this week, some City Council members will not let the issue die.

Councilman Goode Working on Alternate Paid Sick Leave Plan

Despite Mayor Nutter’s decision to veto the controversial paid sick leave bill this week, some City Council members will not let the issue die.

Nutter rejected a bill introduced by Councilmen Bill Greenlee and Darrell Clarke that would require most city employers to provide earned paid sick leave. The Council members, who got the legislation passed 9-8, said they would see if they could rally 12 votes for a veto override when Council returns for their next session Sept. 8.

But today Councilman Wilson Goode Jr. put forth another option to deal with the issue. Goode sent out a notice that he would introduce another version of paid sick leave on Sept. 8, as an amendment to the Philadelphia 21st century minimum wage and benefits standard.

“I’m assuming Clarke and Greenlee will try to get an override,” Goode said. “We’re not sure there will be enough votes for an override. This is another option.”

This option, Goode said targets less employers and further excludes small businesses and some non-profit businesses.

“I think those who support paid sick will support this as well and it may get more support,” Goode said.

Full-time non-seasonal, non-temporary employees could earn sick leave benefits that are at least equivalent to what was required under the vetoed bill. Only employers subject to the minimum wage and benefits standard would be required to provide paid sick leave.

Those employers include city agencies, departments and offices, for-profit service contractors or subcontractors on contract which receive $10,000 or more annually from the City with annual gross receipts over $1,000,000 and public agencies that receive $10,000 or more a year from the city.

Also included are non-profit service contractors or subcontractors on contract that receive more than $100,000 a year, recipients of city leases, concessions, franchises or subcontractors that employ more than 25 workers and city financial aid recipients which would be required to comply with the terms of the legislation for five years after the aid is received.

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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