Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Bill would eliminate city pension for convicted pervs

After child-sex allegations surfaced against former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky state lawmakers weren’t the only ones eyeing new ways to address flaws in the pension law.

Bill would eliminate city pension for convicted pervs

After child-sex allegations surfaced against former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky state lawmakers weren’t the only ones eyeing new ways to address flaws in the pension law.

Many legislators, including City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown were shocked to learn that Sandusky, the accused child-molester still receives a $58,898 annual pension from the State Employees Retirement System.

Brown, a Penn State graduate and former employee will introduce today, a bill that disqualifies any city employee found guilty of a sex crime against a minor from collecting a city pension.

“When citizens break the law, Megan’s Law, they should not get their pension,” Brown said. “They have interrupted that child’s life forever and their life should be interrupted as well.”

Meanwhile, state lawmakers in Harrisburg are reexamining bills that would keep state and municipal workers convicted of a sex crime against a minor from collecting a public pension.

Under state pension law, only workers convicted of crimes related to their public office or employment would lose their pension.

A Daily News article in July identified three former Philadelphia cops who had been convicted of child-sex offenses and who were collecting city pensions. One has since lost his pension, and a second could soon lose his.

Meanwhile, a third, Adrian Makuch, a former crime-scene-unit officer pleaded guilty last year to unlawfully contacting a minor and related offenses, but he’s still receiving a $2,203.56-a-month pension.

“Hopefully, this bill will serve as a warning,” Brown said.

About this blog
Chris Brennan, a native Philadelphian and graduate of Temple University, joined the Daily News in 1999. He has written about SEPTA, the Philadelphia School District, the legalization of casino gambling, state government, the mayor, the governor, City Council and political campaigns. E-mail tips to brennac@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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Sean Collins Walsh is from Bucks County and went to Northwestern University. He joined the Daily News copy desk in 2012 and now covers the Nutter administration. Before that, he interned at papers including The New York Times, The Dallas Morning News and The Seattle Times. E-mail tips to walshSE@phillynews.com
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