Saturday, February 28, 2015

Are These The Last Days Of The Fairmount Park Commission?

A City Council committee this afternoon endorsed an idea to fold the Fairmount Park Commission into the Department of Recreation, giving the mayor control over the massive stock of public land for the first time since 1867.

Are These The Last Days Of The Fairmount Park Commission?

A City Council committee this afternoon endorsed an idea to fold the Fairmount Park Commission into the Department of Recreation, which would give the mayor control over the massive stock of public land for the first time since 1867.  Council's Law and Government Committee approved legislation that would ask voters if they want to combine the two agencies into the new Department of Parks and Recreation.

That agency would report directly to the mayor.  The legislation would create a Commission on Parks and Recreation that would be radically different from the current Fairmount Park Commission, which is selected in secret by the city Board of Judges.  The new commission would draw its members from applicants who are interviewed in a public City Council hearing.  Council would select 25 names to send to the mayor, who would nominate nine members.  The 15-member commission would be rounded out by elected officials.  It would advise on park policy but not control it.

Current Commission president Robert N.C. Nix III today said he had no problems with the way the members are now chosen but granted the political climate has changed. Council and Mayor Nutter want to shift control for park land. "As long as you get good applicants, its fine," Nix said.  But Commission vice president Alex Bonavitacola cited the old adage: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" while opposing the move.

Nutter, who has started boosting funding for park issues, this week said combining the two agencies would make the city more efficient in delivering services.  The legislation for a proposed charter change, if approved by Council's last spring session next week, could be placed on the November general election ballot.

About this blog
William Bender, a Drexel graduate who landed at the Daily News in 2007, has covered everything from South Philly mobsters to doomsday hucksters. He occasionally writes about local food trucks and always eats everything on his plate, whether it be a bloody rib eye or a corrupt politician. E-mail tips to benderw@phillynews.com
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Jenny DeHuff is a 2005 graduate of the University of Rhode Island, where she cut her teeth in journalism. A South Philly transplant from New England, she joined the Daily News City Hall Bureau in 2013. For the past several years, she has worked as an investigative reporter exposing corruption in suburban politics, covering sometimes ghastly criminal court cases and following the people’s money and how its spent. In addition to being a dogged news hound, she enjoys reading and writing about travel, animals, Irish whiskey and aviation. E-mail tips to dehuffj@phillynews.com
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David Gambacorta, has been a reporter with the Daily News since 2005, covering crime, police corruption and all of the other bizarre things that happen in Philadelphia. Now he’s covering the 2015 mayor’s race, because he enjoys a good circus just as much as the next guy. He’s always looking to get a cup of coffee. Send news tips and other musings on life to gambacd@phillynews.com
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