Thursday, May 28, 2015

Nine Traffic Court judges, three others indicted in ticket-fixing case

A federal grand jury has charged six Philadelphia Traffic Court judges, the former court director of operations and two businessmen in a ticket-fixing case unsealed Thursday morning.

Nine Traffic Court judges, three others indicted in ticket-fixing case

A federal grand jury has charged six Philadelphia Traffic Court judges, the former court director of operations and two businessmen in a ticket-fixing case unsealed Thursday morning.  Three more Traffic Court judges were also charged in separate documents.  Those indicted are:

  • Former administrative Judge Michael Sullivan, who was removed from his leadership post by the state Supreme Court in December 2011 but was still hearing cases.
  • Judge Michael Lowry, the son of a ward leader, who admitted to an investigations firm hired by the Supreme Court that ticket fixing happened in Traffic Court.
  • Judge Robert Mulgrew, who was suspended by the Supreme Court in September after being indicted on unrelated charges.
  • Former President Judge Thomasine Tynes, who retired in July.
  • Former Administrative Judge Fortunato Perri Sr., who is retired.
  • Bucks County District Judge H. Warren Hogeland, who hears cases in Traffic Court.
  • Delaware County District Judge Kenneth Miller, who heard cases in Traffic Court until 2008.
  • Chester County District Judge Mark Bruno, who heard cases in Philadelphia's Traffic Court.
  • William Hird, the director of operations, who retired in November 2011, two months after FBI and IRS agents raided his home, office and a bar he runs in South Philly.
  • Henry "Eddy" Alfano, a tow truck company operator who also operates two strip clubs.
  • Robert Moy, a translation company owner who provides services in Traffic Court.

The eight defendants are charged with conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud, wire fraud, mail fraud and aiding and abetting a crime.  Tynes, Lowry and Mulgrew were also charged with perjury, accused of lying to a grand jury. Singletary and Hird face charges of making false statements to the FBI. 

Perri, Miller and Hogeland were charged through "information" documents, which means they waived their rights to have their cases presented to the grand jury, a sign that they are expected to take a plea deal.

About this blog
William Bender, a Drexel graduate who landed at the Daily News in 2007, has covered everything from South Philly mobsters to doomsday hucksters. He occasionally writes about local food trucks and always eats everything on his plate, whether it be a bloody rib eye or a corrupt politician. E-mail tips to benderw@phillynews.com
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David Gambacorta, has been a reporter with the Daily News since 2005, covering crime, police corruption and all of the other bizarre things that happen in Philadelphia. Now he’s covering the 2015 mayor’s race, because he enjoys a good circus just as much as the next guy. He’s always looking to get a cup of coffee. Send news tips and other musings on life to gambacd@phillynews.com
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