Thursday, July 24, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

POSTED: Friday, June 13, 2014, 1:41 AM
N.J. Gov. Chris Christie and Jimmy Fallon show of different 'Dad dances' on Thursday night's show.

Gov. Christie said Thursday on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon that he would beat Democrat Hillary Clinton in a bid for president – “hypothetically.”

In his first foray back into the late-night television circuit since the Bridgegate scandal threatened to derail his national ambitions, the Republican governor, asked by Fallon whether he could win in a 2016 matchup with the former Secretary of State, said: “Hypothetically? You bet.” The audience applauded.

Fallon paused, then asked: “In a dance-off?”


POSTED: Thursday, June 12, 2014, 9:41 PM

Gov. Christie will make an appearance on late-night television tonight for the first time since Bridgegate with an interview on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon – who skewered the governor in January in a spoof featuring none other than Christie’s musical idol.

Bruce Springsteen joined Fallon after the bridge scandal made national headlines to perform a parody of “Born to Run,” with a chorus of “We’re stuck in Gov. Chris Christie’s Fort Lee New Jersey traffic jam.”

Excerpts released by NBC in advance of the show don’t indicate whether the Boss's parody will be a topic of conversation. But Christie is expected to poke fun -- at least briefly -- at the controversy that has threatened his presidential ambitions.

POSTED: Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 6:10 PM
Recovery from Sandy, which was initially a strength for Christie Christie and helped him win a second term, is joining his list of liabilities along with persistent budget gaps and the George Washington Bridge scandal.

What does it take to respond to Bridgegate? For Gov. Christie, it’s a team of 60 attorneys, some working seven days a week, and sometimes for 14 hours a day – at a cost to state taxpayers of $2.17 million in February, according to an invoice released earlier this week.

The invoice from the Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher law firm follows a January bill of $1.08 million. Another big bill seems likely for March: At the end of that month, the firm released a report that cleared Christie of wrongdoing in the George Washington Bridge lane closures, and also dismissed allegations that federal Hurricane Sandy money had been improperly distributed by the state.

The February invoice, released by the state Attorney General’s Office Monday, spans 81 pages, and gives partially redacted descriptions of just how much work lawyers were doing to write the report and respond to subpoenas for documents. Federal prosecutors are probing the closures, along with a legislative panel.

POSTED: Thursday, June 5, 2014, 7:53 PM
N.J. Gov. Chris Christie and Pa. Gov. Tom Corbett (Ralph Wilson / AP)

Gov. Christie has been traveling the country recently to stump for Republican governors. Over the next few days, he’ll be appearing with a governor a little closer to home – Gov. Corbett.

Christie, the chairman of the Republican Governors Association, will attend events with Corbett in Pittsburgh Friday and in Philadelphia Monday, according to the RGA.

Corbett, who is running for reelection in the fall, is trailing Democrat Tom Wolf by as much as 25 points in recent polls.

POSTED: Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 12:10 PM
FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks in Trenton, N.J. Newly released emails show that a top aide to Christie had at least some involvement in the unexpected shutdown of lanes on the George Washington Bridge. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

People are losing interest in Bridgegate, and Gov. Christie’s approval ratings are no longer tumbling, according to a Fairleigh Dickinson University PublicMind poll out today.

The Republican governor’s approval rating – now 44 percent – is statistically unchanged from March, when 41 percent of registered voters approved of his job performance, the poll said.

In November, Christie’s approval rating in the poll was 61 percent. It fell to 48 percent following the George Washington Bridge revelations in January.

POSTED: Thursday, May 22, 2014, 2:58 PM

Did Gov. Christie err in delivering a speech to a crowd of Jewish philanthropists -- without once mentioning Israel by name?

Christie's "Israel"-less remarks Sunday night at the Champions of Jewish Values gala in New York have drawn heat from the president of the Zionist Organization of America, Morton Klein, who earlier this week accused Christie of showing "enormous disrespect."

"It’s almost not to be explained, except huge discomfort with expressing strong support for Israel," said Klein, who previously attacked Christie after the Republican governor used the term "occupied territories" during a speech to the Republican Jewish Coalition in March.

POSTED: Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 4:12 PM

More than four months since Bridgegate interrupted his national ascent, Gov. Christie said in Washington Wednesday that the scandal hadn’t imperiled a presidential bid.

Instead, Christie said, the controversy will be seen as a “footnote” to his career.

“As far as the impact on my political future, I think it will have none, because I didn’t do anything,” Christie said at the Peter G. Peterson Foundation Fiscal Summit, an event that also featured a talk from former President Bill Clinton. Christie’s remarks were streamed online by the event.

POSTED: Monday, May 5, 2014, 5:21 PM

If Gov. Christie were to resign early to pursue a bid for the presidency, a special election could be held to replace him, depending on the timing of his resignation.

That scenario – an unusual one – could put candidates with lesser financial resources at a disadvantage: Unlike candidates in a regular gubernatorial election, they wouldn’t be able to opt into the state’s public financing program to raise money for their campaigns.

The discrepancy, realized by officials at the state Election Law Enforcement Commission, prompted the introduction of a bill that cleared a Senate committee Monday. The bill – sponsored by Sen. Jim Whelan (D., Atlantic) – would allow gubernatorial candidates in special elections to tap into public financing, letting them receive $2 in public money for every $1 they raise in private donations. Candidates must raise and spend $380,000 to qualify for the program, which caps their spending at $12.2 million in the general election.

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