Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Christie's housing plan may end up back in the courthouse

COAH, shmoah? So reports colleague Maya Rao, who delved into the issue of affordable housing and found that due in part to a stalemate between Gov. Christie and Democratic legislators, the fate of the Council on Affordable Housing (COAH) could end up in the courts. The New Jersey Supreme Court may ultimately decide, in an age-old Garden State tradition, how many homes that towns need to build for poor people in one of the most expensive states to live in the USA.

Christie's housing plan may end up back in the courthouse

Jean Siciliano in her apartment in a new housing development in Evesham that was built under New Jersey´s 1985 affordable-housing law. Siciliano, who lost her job in a 2009 corporate downsizing, calls her home a "godsend." She pays $658 in monthly rent. (LAURENCE KESTERSON / Staff Photographer)
Jean Siciliano in her apartment in a new housing development in Evesham that was built under New Jersey's 1985 affordable-housing law. Siciliano, who lost her job in a 2009 corporate downsizing, calls her home a "godsend." She pays $658 in monthly rent. (LAURENCE KESTERSON / Staff Photographer) LAURENCE KESTERSON / Staff Photographer

COAH, shmoah? So reports colleague Maya Rao, who delved into the issue of affordable housing and found that due in part to a stalemate between Gov. Christie and Democratic legislators, the fate of the Council on Affordable Housing (COAH) could end up in the courts. The New Jersey Supreme Court may ultimately decide, in an age-old Garden State tradition, how many homes that towns need to build for poor people in one of the most expensive states to live in the USA.

And that makes the reverberations from Christie's recent shake-up at the Supreme Court that much more interesting.

About this blog

Christie Chronicles Inquirer Blogger
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected