Thursday, July 30, 2015

Bar-Be Gone

Since my last blog posting, many things have happened. I have been having my math teacher, Ms. Isaksen, come over to my house to help me catch up in math. Thankfully, I don't have far to go until I am all caught up.

Bar-Be Gone

Since my last blog posting, many things have happened. I have been having my math teacher, Ms. Isaksen, come over to my house to help me catch up in math. Thankfully, I don't have far to go until I am all caught up. There is still much more work to be done until I am caught up in language arts, but not much until I am done with religion. Thank the Lord, I don't have anything to do for science and social studies. (Well, not that I know of.) The point is that I am pretty sure I will get to seventh grade. Cross your fingers for me!

On another note, I haven't been so bored the past few days because my friends have been coming to see me. Last Tuesday, one of my best friends - Gabby - came over and we hung out for an hour or two. Then, on Thursday, some of my other best friends, Valicia, Meghan, and Christina, came over and we made jewelry. It’s so nice that my friends would take time to come and visit me when I can't really get out of the house easily. Frankly, nothing is easy when you have a stupid bar in between your legs. The thing really stinks.

Speaking of that stupid bar, it might be coming off! I am going to see Dr. Dormans on Thursday and if all goes well, the bar will hopefully come out. Some other good news: Half of my steri-strips are gone. Now you might be asking, "What are steri-strips?" I lik the way Wikipedia explains i:

Steri-strips are "thin adhesive strips which can be used to close small wounds, generically known as butterfly stitches. They can be applied across the laceration in a manner which pulls the skin on either side of the wound together. Steri-strips may be used instead of stitches in some injuries, because they lessen scarring and are easier to care for."

The longer the steri-strips stay on, the better the scar looks - and mine looks pretty good, like I drew on myself with a white marker.

We are approaching double-digit rounds of chemotherapy this coming Thursday. After this round, we will only have four rounds left to go!

More coverage
 
Onco Girl: Cancer patient Rachel Kovach's blog
 
Keeping up with schoolwork
 
Sometimes it’s social, sometimes it’s work
About this blog
Rachel Kovach, 12, is a seventh-grader at Mother Theresa Regional School in Atlantic Highlands, N.J. She lives in Highlands, N.J., near the Sandy Hook national seashore, with her parents, Mari and Kurt Kovach.

Since first grade, Rachel has been swimming with the Monmouth Barracudas, a year-round competitive United States Swimming Club program. She hopes to continue competitive swimming after her cancer treatment; if not, she envisions coaching someday or maybe a career in medicine. Figure skating and jazz dancing have been big parts of her life. One of the things she hates about being in the hospital is missing her dog Cocoa and her many friends.

Rachel's doctors

These are the key physicians overseeing Rachel’s care at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia:

Naomi BalamuthNaomi Balamuth, pediatric oncologist, specializes in treating pediatric sarcomas, a subset of solid tumors.

 

 

Richard B. WomerRichard B. Womer, pediatric oncologist, led studies of the latest chemotherapy treatment protocol for Ewing’s sarcoma.

 

 

John P. DormansJohn P. Dormans, M.D., chief of orthopaedic surgery, is an international expert in the surgical treatment of musculoskeletal tumors.

 

Timeline of Rachel Kovach’s Treatment

Dec. 3, 2010: Pain in Rachel's right knee is initially diagnosed as tendinitis.

Jan. 20: An MRI reveals a tumor in right leg.

Jan 24: Rachel sees John Dormans, chief of orthopedic surgery at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Jan. 27: A biopsy confirms Ewing's sarcoma.

February to mid-April: Regimens of chemotherapy alternate every other week. The three-drug regimen is given over two days; the two-drug regimen is given over five days.

May 3: Surgery replaces most of the right femur with a prosthesis.

May 5: A Children's Hospital team will help Rachel get out of bed.

May 10 to September: Alternating regimens of chemotherapy are to resume.

Around May 10: Physical therapy will begin in the hospital and continue for at least several months after Rachel goes home.

Onco Girl
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