Monday, September 1, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Developer unveils $100M plan for Spectrum land

A plan to bring life to the vast asphalt desert at Philadelphia's sports complex took another step forward today when a Baltimore developer released drawings for a $100 million entertainment center connecting the Wachovia Center to Citizens Bank Park.

Developer unveils $100M plan for Spectrum land

A rendering of the proposed Philly Live Project. (Image via Cordish.com)
A rendering of the proposed Philly Live Project. (Image via Cordish.com)

A plan to bring life to the vast asphalt desert at Philadelphia’s sports complex took another step forward today when a Baltimore developer released drawings for a $100 million entertainment center connecting the Wachovia Center to Citizens Bank Park.

The glitzy architectural renderings, which were presented to the city Planning Commission, showed a two-block-long, diagonal street running between the two sports venues, across the land now occupied by the Spectrum. Modeled on such destinations as Boston’s Quincy Market and Baltimore’s Power Point Live, the street would be lined with restaurants, bars and shops.

 

The project would replace the Spectrum, which is scheduled to be demolished early next year. It is being developed jointly by Comcast-Spectacor and the Cordish Company, the developer behind much of the nightlife at Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

Inga Saffron Inquirer Architecture Critic
About this blog

Inga Saffron believes there is architecture and there are places, and you can’t write about one without writing about the other.

Since becoming the Inquirer’s architecture critic in 1999, she has been just as likely to turn her eye toward Philadelphia’s waterfronts and sidewalks as to the latest glittering skyscraper. She is drawn to projects of all sizes and shapes, but especially those that form the backdrop of our daily lives.

Inga Saffron came to architecture criticism after five years as a foreign correspondent in Russia and Yugoslavia, where she covered two wars and was a witness to the destruction of two great cities, Sarajevo and Grozny. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in criticism in 2004, 2008 and 2009.

Reach Inga at isaffron@phillynews.com.

Inga Saffron Inquirer Architecture Critic
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