Friday, July 25, 2014
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Senator: Will Comcast discriminate against conservatives?

WASHINGTON -- Utah Sen. Mike Lee questioned whether a combined Comcast-Time Warner would have added power to discriminate against conservative views as the Senate Judiciary Committee opened a hearing on the merger.

Senator: Will Comcast discriminate against conservatives?

WASHINGTON -- Utah Sen. Mike Lee questioned whether a combined Comcast-Time Warner would have added power to discriminate against conservative views as the Senate Judiciary Committee opened a hearing on the merger.

"Considering the significant share of the video and internet market Comcat has, and considering the well-known political leanings of NBC, I’ve heard concern that Comcast might have the incentive and the ability to discriminate against certain political content, including, for example, conservative political content, and that capacity could be signficnatly enhanced as a result of this transaction,"  Lee, one of the Senate's most conservative members, said  in his opening statement.

MSNBC has become an openly liberal answer to Fox News.

Lee's comments came at the end of a statement that otherwise raised general questions about the power and reach of a combined Comcast-Time Warner.

"It’s essential that we apply proper economic analysis and ground our conclusions in the evidence before us by ensuring that we protect competition, rather than trying to protect any individual company or competitor from competition," Lee concluded.

Comcast officials did not have a chance to immediately respond.

Previous posts from the hearing are here.


You can follow Tamari on Twitter or email him at jtamari@phillynews.com.

 

Jonathan Tamari
About this blog

Jonathan Tamari is the Inquirer’s Washington correspondent. He writes about the lawmakers, politics and policy that affect Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Tamari previously covered the Philadelphia Eagles and the NFL. Before that he worked in Trenton, reporting on the characters and color of New Jersey state government. He lives in Washington.

Reach Jonathan at jtamari@phillynews.com.

Jonathan Tamari
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