Sunday, February 7, 2016

Holt launches second Web ad

WASHINGTON – Congressman Rush Holt is back with another Web ad, once again staking out a position as the most liberal choice in the race for the Democratic Senate nomination and seeking to contrast himself with the favorite, Newark Mayor Cory Booker.

Holt launches second Web ad

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WASHINGTON – Congressman Rush Holt is back with another Web ad, once again staking out a position as the most liberal choice in the race for the Democratic Senate nomination and seeking to contrast himself with the favorite, Newark Mayor Cory Booker.

“I like Cory Booker,” one young woman says near the end of the video, “but for Senate, I’m with Rush.”

Much like Holt’s first video, in which he declared “I’m no Cory Booker,” this one focuses heavily on the Congressman's biography (clarifying that he’s technically an astrophysicist, even if his own bumper stickers label him a rocket scientist) and includes nods to liberals’ greatest hits.

A series of speakers declare that Holt will fight for background checks on all gun purchases, rules to curb climate change, ending tax breaks for corporations and closing Guantanamo, among other issues. It points out that he voted against the Iraq War, the Patriot Act and has stood against “warrantless spying” on Americans.

Holt himself appears only briefly in the one-minute twenty-five second spot, seeming to acknowledge his status the uphill climb he faces in trying to upset Booker, who polls show has a strong lead.

“We’ve got a lot of work to do,” Holt says, and then directs viewers to his Web site.

Holt and fellow Congressman Frank Pallone have been battling over who is the best liberal heir to the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, while Booker has cast himself as a centrist who can work with both parties.

Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver is also running for the Democratic nomination, though she has not, to this point, had an active campaign. She has said she was focused on the legislative session.

This is Holt’s second Web ad, while Booker has already gone up on cable television throughout the state.


You can follow Tamari on Twitter or email him at jtamari@phillynews.com.

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About this blog

Jonathan Tamari is the Inquirer’s Washington correspondent. He writes about the lawmakers, politics and policy that affect Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Tamari previously covered the Philadelphia Eagles and the NFL. Before that he worked in Trenton, reporting on the characters and color of New Jersey state government. He lives in Washington.

Reach Jonathan at jtamari@phillynews.com.

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