Thursday, May 28, 2015

POSTED: Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 6:12 PM
Michael Palis, a (Rutgers-Camden)

Michael A. Palis, a Rutgers-Camden computer science professor who helped start the school’s computer science department, will become the campus’ next provost, the school announced Thursday.

As provost, Palis will be the chief academic officer for the campus, including overseeing faculty hiring and development, curricula, admissions, the office of civic engagement, and development of new academic programs. He begins July 1, succeeding Rayman Solomon, a former dean of Rutgers-Camden's law school who became provost in 2014 for an 18-month term.

Solomon had been dean of the law school since 1998, until becoming provost Jan. 1, 2014. He will continue to teach law on campus.

POSTED: Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 10:33 AM

The national office of Kappa Delta Rho, the fraternity suspended by Pennsylvania State University this week for three years in the wake of allegations its members posted nude photos on private Facebook pages, had no harsh words for the punishment handed down.

"We respect the university's decision and look forward to working with the university to effectuate improvements in the Greek system on campus," Joseph Rosenberg, national executive director of Kappa Delta Rho, said in a statement. "KDR will endeavor to take any actions necessary to have our chapter retain recognition after the three year period has concluded."

The university announced on Tuesday night that it was shutting down the frat after an investigation showed evidence of hazing, drug use, underage drinking and sexual harassment by some members. The controversy erupted in March after a former frat member told State College police about private Facebook posts that showed nude and partially nude women, who appeared to be unconscious or unaware they were being photographed.

POSTED: Tuesday, May 26, 2015, 7:19 PM
This Tuesday, March 17, 2015 photo shows The Kappa Delta Rho fraternity house at Penn State University in State College, Pa. The fraternity has been suspended as police investigate allegations that members used a private, invitation-only Facebook page to post photos of nude and partly nude women in sexual and other embarrassing positions, some apparently asleep or passed out. (AP Photo/Centre Daily Times, Christopher Weddle) MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS

Pennsylvania State University will shut down for three years the fraternity facing allegations that members posted pictures of nude and partially nude women - some who appeared to be sleeping or passed out - on private Facebook pages, the school announced Tuesday.

President Eric Barron said the university decided against a recommendation from the student-led Interfraternity Council - the body that governs Greek life on campus - for less severe sanctions against Kappa Delta Rho, which already was targeted for reorganization by its national office after the allegations emerged in March.

The university, which has completed its investigation, found evidence of hazing, the use and sale of drugs, underage drinking, sexual misconduct and harassment and "exploitation in terms of photographs," Barron said. More specifically, the university said Tuesday night, the investigation uncovered persistent harassment of two females, and "photographing individuals in extremely compromising positions and posting these photos" online.

POSTED: Friday, May 22, 2015, 4:54 PM
Philadelphia University this week promoted its executive dean of the College of Science, Health and Liberal Arts to provost.

Matt Dane Baker’s new appointment becomes effective June 1, the college announced. He replaces Randy Swearer, who is leaving to become vice president for education at Autodesk in San Francisco, a 3-D design software company.

“Matt Baker and Randy Swearer have worked closely together for five years,” Philadelphia University President Stephen Spinelli Jr. said in a statement. “This is textbook leadership succession and a perfect transition.”

POSTED: Thursday, May 21, 2015, 5:30 PM

St. Joseph’s University earlier this month suspended play for its women’s varsity softball team for the rest of the season, amid allegations of hazing and bullying.

The Catholic university on Philadelphia’s Main Line at that time declined to detail those allegations.

A lawsuit filed this week by a former player does just that - in excrutiating detail, some of it so vile that you won’t read it here.

POSTED: Tuesday, May 19, 2015, 2:44 PM
The late Penn State Head Football Coach Joe Paterno. (Charles Fox/Staff Photographer )

At the helm of Penn State’s athletic department for less than a year, Sandy Barbour said “every week, every day, every month” she learns more about the overwhelmingly positive impact late football Coach Joe Paterno had on the university.

And she’s not talking about national championships.

“To me, Coach Paterno brought a … value of combining athletics and academic success that I’ve not seen anywhere else, the idea of success with honor,” said Barbour, former athletic director of the University of California, who previously worked at Notre Dame, Northwestern, Tulane and the University of Massachusetts. “Over the course of nine months I’ve met with former student athletes who played for Coach Paterno. They don’t talk about the football part. They don’t talk about the national championships.… They talk about him, his insistence on making them into good citizens and good men. That’s what they learned from him.

POSTED: Monday, May 18, 2015, 5:07 PM

Last November, Penn State President Eric Barron said he would wade into a matter that has deeply divided Penn State’s board of trustees.

He announced he would review the controversial investigative report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh on the Sandusky scandal that found former university leaders culpable of a cover-up.

At the time, he didn’t set a timetable for that review, but noted in a statement at the time: “…I assured the board I would move with all deliberate speed.”

POSTED: Monday, May 18, 2015, 1:54 PM

Temple University is starting a Confucius Institute - the first in Philadelphia - focusing on the teaching of Chinese language and culture, officials announced Monday.

The school will partner with China's Zhejiang Normal University, which will send two Chinese language professors here to teach in the institute, said Temple Provost Hai-Lung Dai.

Each university will contribute in-kind services and personnel worth $150,000 to run the institute, which will start in July, Dai said.

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CampusInq provides higher education news about colleges and universities throughout the Philadelphia region and beyond. Look here for breaking news stories, features and newsy nuggets that might or might not appear in the print version of the Inquirer.

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