Saturday, August 29, 2015

Canned food sales to benefit Camden Children's Garden

As part of its hunger relief efforts in Camden, Whole Food Market will be donating 1 percent of net sales of canned goods in its Mid-Atlantic region stores to the Camden Children's Garden. Selected canned good such as as albacore tuna, sliced beets and a variety of beans are being offered at discounted prices through Oct. 16 when the Camden drive ends.

Canned food sales to benefit Camden Children's Garden

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As part of its hunger relief efforts in Camden, Whole Food Market will be donating 1 percent of net sales of canned goods in its Mid-Atlantic region stores to the Camden Children's Garden.

Selected canned goods such as albacore tuna, sliced beets and a variety of beans are being offered at discounted prices through Oct. 16, when the Camden drive also ends. Participating stores include those in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Maryland, Washington D.C. and Virginia, which make up the Mid-Atlantic region.

"When our grocery team announced a three-week sale (Sept. 26 - Oct. 16) featuring discounts on hundreds of high quality canned goods, we saw it as an opportunity to bring additional customer awareness to the positive work being accomplished in Camden," Jared Earley, Whole Foods Market’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Marketing Project Manager, said in a statement. "We're thrilled by how our stores have gotten behind the promotion, designing creative signage, displays, and food collections to garner additional support for the Camden garden projects."

Earlier this year, Whole Foods started a two-year partnership with the Camden Children's Garden to help develop more community gardens and fund various health-related projects. The Children's Garden has helped plant more than 100 community gardens throughout the city,

Whole Foods expects to raise more than $10,000 for the Cans for Camden initiative.

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About this blog

Allison Steele writes about Camden’s schools, government and businesses. Most importantly, she writes about the city’s residents. She is a former crime reporter who covered the Camden and Philadelphia police departments for the Inquirer. A Philly native, she has been with the Inquirer since 2008.

Send comments, tips and story ideas to asteele@philly.com, call 856-779-3876, or reach out on Twitter @AESteele.

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