Sunday, August 2, 2015

Hillary more popular than Obama, Quinnipiac Poll says

Hillary Clinton more popular than President Obama and just about everybody else in politics, according to new Quinnipiac poll.

Hillary more popular than Obama, Quinnipiac Poll says

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Outgoing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton waves as she leaves the State Department in Washington, Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, for last time as America´s top diplomat. After four years, Clinton has traveled nearly one million miles to meet with leaders in over 100 countries. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Outgoing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton waves as she leaves the State Department in Washington, Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, for last time as America's top diplomat. After four years, Clinton has traveled nearly one million miles to meet with leaders in over 100 countries. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Hillary Clinton would have loved to get this news in 2008, when she was battling Barack Obama for the Democratic nomination.

Clinton, the former first lady, senator and secretary of state, is now more popular with American voters than the president, according to a Quinnipiac University national poll released Friday. She has a favorability rating of 61 percent positive/34 percent negative (+27), while Obama sits at 51 percent/46 percent (+5).

Ouch.

The independent poll also finds that Obama’s job approval rating has also plummeted as the glow of his solid reelection victory fades. His approval stands at break-even, with 46 percent approving to 45 percent disapproving of how he is handling the presidency. That’s down from a 53-40 percent approval ratio in Quinnipiac’s December survey.

“Hillary Clinton ends her term as Secretary of State and the bruising inquiry into the Benghazi murders as easily the most popular actor on the American political stage today,” said Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute.

“After an initial burst of reelection enthusiasm for President Barack Obama, we may be seeing a return to the age of the polarized electorate,” Brown said.

The poll found that Clinton outstrips Vice President Biden, a potential rival in the 2016 Democratic presidential race, as well as a series of leading national GOP figures. Full results are available here.

From January 30 – February 4, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,772 registered voters with a margin-of-error of +/- 2.3 percentage points.  Live interviewers called land lines and cell phones.

 

Inquirer Politics Writer
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About this blog

Inquirer staff writer Thomas Fitzgerald blogs about national politics.

Reach Thomas at tfitzgerald@phillynews.com.

Tom Fitzgerald
Thomas Fitzgerald Inquirer Politics Writer
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