Monday, September 22, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Chelsea Clinton's mom-in-law may run for Congress in Pa.

Former U.S. Rep. Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky (D.,Pa.) may attempt a comeback 20 years after voters bounced her from Congress for casting the decisive vote for President Clinton's plan to raise taxes.

Chelsea Clinton's mom-in-law may run for Congress in Pa.

Two decades ago, Democrat Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky committed political suicide.

A freshman member of the U.S. House from Montgomery County, she cast the 11th-hour deciding vote to enact President Bill Clinton’s budget in the summer of 1993, including a $241 billion tax increase that raised rates on high-income earners and bumped up the gasoline tax, among other things.

Margolies-Mezvinksy had promised to vote no, and angry voters kicked her out in 1994.

But now, could an MMM comeback be in the offing?

 KYW Newsradio reported Tuesday that she is considering a run to replace U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz in the 13th District seat. Schwartz launched her campaign for the 2014 Democratic nomination for governor on Monday.

Journalist Larry Kane quoted Margolies-Mezvinsky as saying, “It is premature, because we have a Congressperson in office now, but it is true that I am talking about it with party leaders and family members.”

She divorced former husband Edward Mezvinsky, who was an Iowa congressman and Pennsylvania Democratic Party chairman, in 2007 while he was in federal prison after being convicted of fraud.

One of their children, Marc Mezvinsky, is married to Chelsea Clinton. The former president could be an asset in a race that is attracting a lot of interest among Democrats, if MMM should decide to go for it.

The 13th District has been redrawn twice since MMM held the seat and, if anything, is much more reliably Democratic, having added Northeast Philadelphia to a smaller patch of Montgomery County.

Schwartz has said she would not run for reelection to the U.S. House and governor at the same time, though such dual filing is legal.

City Controller Jonathan Saidel, state Sen. Daylin Leach, Rep. Brendan Boyle and physician Valerie Arkoosh have said they plan to run for the Democratic nomination to succeed Schwartz. At least a half dozen more have also expressed interest.

Thomas Fitzgerald Inquirer Politics Writer
About this blog

Inquirer staff writer Thomas Fitzgerald blogs about national politics.

Reach Thomas at tfitzgerald@phillynews.com.

Tom Fitzgerald
Thomas Fitzgerald Inquirer Politics Writer
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected