Friday, November 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

The Gipper loses one

America is a center-right nation...really? Why did voters (in a nationwide survey by Rasmussen Reports) just elect Franklin Roosevelt over Ronald Reagan in a political dream match-up, by a solid margin? Forty-five percent (45%) of U.S. voters say FDR, the Democratic father of the big government New Deal who led the country to victory in World War II, was the better president of the two. But 40% say Reagan, the Republican champion of small-government conservatism and the winner of the Cold War, was a better president. Fifteen percent (15%) aren’t sure which of the two they like better in a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. For a plurality of all voters (43%), however, it’s still best to describe a political candidate as being like Reagan. Twenty-six percent (26%) see it as a negative, while 29% regard it as somewhere in between. The last part is critical: Americans liked Reagan, the man, back in the 1980s, and they still like the idea of him, a leader who exudes optimism, today. But they didn't like his actual policies back then (55 percent of Americans wanted to move away from Reagan's policies, according to a 1987 poll), and they especially don't like the bastardized version re-written by Grover Norquist and imposed by George W. Bush and Dick Cheney. Americans want a New Deal...again. Sounds like a good idea for a book.

The Gipper loses one



America is a center-right nation...really? Why did voters (in a nationwide survey by Rasmussen Reports) just elect Franklin Roosevelt over Ronald Reagan in a political dream match-up, by a solid margin?

Forty-five percent (45%) of U.S. voters say FDR, the Democratic father of the big government New Deal who led the country to victory in World War II, was the better president of the two.

But 40% say Reagan, the Republican champion of small-government conservatism and the winner of the Cold War, was a better president. Fifteen percent (15%) aren’t sure which of the two they like better in a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey.

For a plurality of all voters (43%), however, it’s still best to describe a political candidate as being like Reagan. Twenty-six percent (26%) see it as a negative, while 29% regard it as somewhere in between.

The last part is critical: Americans liked Reagan, the man, back in the 1980s, and they still like the idea of him, a leader who exudes optimism, today. But they didn't like his actual policies back then (55 percent of Americans wanted to move away from Reagan's policies, according to a 1987 poll), and they especially don't like the bastardized version re-written by Grover Norquist and imposed by George W. Bush and Dick Cheney. Americans want a New Deal...again.

Sounds like a good idea for a book.
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