Thursday, July 2, 2015

The Gipper loses one

America is a center-right nation...really? Why did voters (in a nationwide survey by Rasmussen Reports) just elect Franklin Roosevelt over Ronald Reagan in a political dream match-up, by a solid margin? Forty-five percent (45%) of U.S. voters say FDR, the Democratic father of the big government New Deal who led the country to victory in World War II, was the better president of the two. But 40% say Reagan, the Republican champion of small-government conservatism and the winner of the Cold War, was a better president. Fifteen percent (15%) aren’t sure which of the two they like better in a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. For a plurality of all voters (43%), however, it’s still best to describe a political candidate as being like Reagan. Twenty-six percent (26%) see it as a negative, while 29% regard it as somewhere in between. The last part is critical: Americans liked Reagan, the man, back in the 1980s, and they still like the idea of him, a leader who exudes optimism, today. But they didn't like his actual policies back then (55 percent of Americans wanted to move away from Reagan's policies, according to a 1987 poll), and they especially don't like the bastardized version re-written by Grover Norquist and imposed by George W. Bush and Dick Cheney. Americans want a New Deal...again. Sounds like a good idea for a book.

The Gipper loses one

0 comments



America is a center-right nation...really? Why did voters (in a nationwide survey by Rasmussen Reports) just elect Franklin Roosevelt over Ronald Reagan in a political dream match-up, by a solid margin?

Forty-five percent (45%) of U.S. voters say FDR, the Democratic father of the big government New Deal who led the country to victory in World War II, was the better president of the two.

But 40% say Reagan, the Republican champion of small-government conservatism and the winner of the Cold War, was a better president. Fifteen percent (15%) aren’t sure which of the two they like better in a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey.

For a plurality of all voters (43%), however, it’s still best to describe a political candidate as being like Reagan. Twenty-six percent (26%) see it as a negative, while 29% regard it as somewhere in between.

The last part is critical: Americans liked Reagan, the man, back in the 1980s, and they still like the idea of him, a leader who exudes optimism, today. But they didn't like his actual policies back then (55 percent of Americans wanted to move away from Reagan's policies, according to a 1987 poll), and they especially don't like the bastardized version re-written by Grover Norquist and imposed by George W. Bush and Dick Cheney. Americans want a New Deal...again.

Sounds like a good idea for a book.
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

Will Bunch
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter