Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Strike Over, Noisy Buses Back

The transit strike is over. Yes, it will be very nice to see the buses and trains running. Children can get to school again. The elderly can reschedule medical appointments they had to miss. And workers too poor (or environmentally sensible) to own a car can stop getting up an hour or two earlier in the morning to map out a strategy for getting to work. (I'm not sure I can continue to look my bus driver in the eye anymore and be the one to say good morning only to get the same no-response stare. But that's a personal matter I'll have to grapple with.)

Strike Over, Noisy Buses Back

0 comments
What say you, Willie? Take the pledge for quieter buses?
What say you, Willie? Take the pledge for quieter buses?
Travel Deals

The transit strike is over. Yes, it will be very nice to see the buses and trains running. Children can get to school again. The elderly can reschedule medical appointments they had to miss. And workers too poor (or environmentally sensible) to own a car can stop getting up an hour or two earlier in the morning to map out  a strategy for getting to work. (I'm not sure I can continue to look my bus driver in the eye anymore and be the one to say good morning only to get the same no-response stare. But that's a personal matter I'll have to grapple with.)

It won't be so great, however, to have to hear buses again. It was a small side benefit to a painful week of no public transportation.

But it was lovely to have the city so quiet.

You didn't have to cup your ears on Chestnut Street. You didn't have to hold your breath on Broad. It was ridiculous that SEPTA took the position a few years ago that musicians busking in subways were making too much noise - while its buses were the source of deafening cacophony. I'm not using the word deafening lightly. I'd bet that SEPTA buses are operating at decibel levels high enough to cause permanent damage.

SEPTA has plans for what it says are quieter buses. We can't wait to hear whether the decibels will really fall.

So, now that we've been reminded just how loud and dirty SEPTA's ancient fleet is, can the agency do anything about it? Union boss Willie Brown (pictured), take note: he who takes on that issue might win a grateful public.

Inquirer Classical Music Critic
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

Peter Dobrin is a classical music critic and culture writer for The Inquirer. Since 1989, he has written music reviews, features, news and commentary for the paper, covering such topics as the Philadelphia Museum of Art at the Venice Biennale, expansion of the Curtis Institute of Music, the Philadelphia Orchestra's bankruptcy declaration in 2011, Philadelphia's evolving performing arts center and the general health of arts and culture.

Dobrin was a French horn player. He earned an undergraduate degree in performance from the University of Miami, and received a master's degree in music criticism from the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied with Elliott Galkin. He has no time to practice today.

Arts Watch
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter