Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

In Lucerne, it's Philadelphia vs. Chicago

A friend who heard both the Philadelphia Orchestra and Chicago Symphony Orchestra concerts in Lucerne in the past few days offered these observations (starting with Chicago):

In Lucerne, it's Philadelphia vs. Chicago

A friend who heard both the Philadelphia Orchestra and Chicago Symphony Orchestra concerts in Lucerne in the past few days offered these observations (starting with Chicago):

Unbelievable. I didn't know an orchestra could play so loud. Even from the second balcony. If you were drawing a cartoon, you'd show everyone with their hair streaming backwards from the force. To be fair, Chicago had somewhere between 10 and 15 more players on the stage than Philadelphia, but the sonic power was more than just that. They played a Bernard Rands piece, Strauss Death and Transfiguration (which I thought was boring) and Shostakovich 5th - which knocked everybody's socks off. I guess I would say that it was a difference in intention between the French concept of iron delicacy (Eiffel Tower) and brute force (city of the big shoulders?). Muti was Muti. He seems ageless. Not a gray hair on his beautiful head. His hair - and the rest of him - completely animated. He shamelessly milked the crowd.

Some things never change!

Peter Dobrin Inquirer Classical Music Critic
About this blog

Peter Dobrin is a classical music critic and culture writer for The Inquirer. Since 1989, he has written music reviews, features, news and commentary for the paper, covering such topics as the Philadelphia Museum of Art at the Venice Biennale, expansion of the Curtis Institute of Music, the Philadelphia Orchestra's bankruptcy declaration in 2011, Philadelphia's evolving performing arts center and the general health of arts and culture.

Dobrin was a French horn player. He earned an undergraduate degree in performance from the University of Miami, and received a master's degree in music criticism from the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied with Elliott Galkin. He has no time to practice today.

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