Friday, July 11, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Composer Magnus Lindberg To New York Philharmonic

Finnish composer Magnus Lindberg (pictured) will become the New York Philharmonic's new composer-in-residence, thanks to a gift to the orchestra's endowment.

Composer Magnus Lindberg To New York Philharmonic

Finnish composer Magnus Lindberg (pictured) will become the New York Philharmonic's new composer-in-residence, thanks to a gift to the orchestra's endowment.

Henry R. Kravis and his wife, Marie-Josee Kravis, will give the Philharmonic $10 million, the proceeds from which (interest, market appreciation) will underwrite the newly reinistated position. The two-year post starts with opening night this Wednesday, when the orchestra will give the premiere of Lindberg's EXPO to open Alan Gilbert's first season as music director.

The Kravis gift will also endow a new music prize awarding $250,000 and a New York Philharmonic commission to a "composer for extraordinary artistic endeavor in the field of new music." The award will be given every two years starting in the 2011-12 season.

The Philharmonic used to have composers-in-residence (Jacob Druckman and David Del Tredici among them), but not since the 1996-97 season.

What better way to signal that a new music director's tenure is going to be about something other than being a conservator?

Peter Dobrin Inquirer Classical Music Critic
About this blog

Peter Dobrin is a classical music critic and culture writer for The Inquirer. Since 1989, he has written music reviews, features, news and commentary for the paper, covering such topics as the Philadelphia Museum of Art at the Venice Biennale, expansion of the Curtis Institute of Music, the Philadelphia Orchestra's bankruptcy declaration in 2011, Philadelphia's evolving performing arts center and the general health of arts and culture.

Dobrin was a French horn player. He earned an undergraduate degree in performance from the University of Miami, and received a master's degree in music criticism from the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied with Elliott Galkin. He has no time to practice today.

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